8 Comments

You know, "subscribing" to Substack newsletters, and accounts like Patreon, certainly helps the authors, which is appropriate when they are important enough to you. But the expenses pile up REALLY fast. I've long subscribed to print magazines, where the cost is like (US) $25 per year and up. (Yes, that's still the case even now!) But they all have printing and mailing expenses in addition to paying writers, editors, office staff, and contributors (if they do). Even full memberships in British Naturism, AANR, and TNS - which all publish excellent printed periodicals - are in the $60/year range.

But I also read many Substack newsletters, for which paid subscriptions are more like $50 to $100 per year - and up. If I were to pay on average $75 per year for 50 of those - it's an expense of $3750 per year! That's more than my yearly home insurance (which is quite high). I don't see how typical Substack or Patreon prices can work economically for most people. My Substack newsletter has no paid version at all, and never will, because I want as many people as possible to read it.

There's a serious problem here with money getting in the way of spreading important and useful information. I don't really know of a good solution for this situation. It should be noted that most naturist organizations (except landed clubs) rely heavily on volunteer (unpaid) efforts. So why shouldn't that also be the case for most naturists who want to communicate widely?

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The push for paid content is understandable and an individual choice. Personally, I don’t subscribe to any naturist content, other than the AANR Bulletin...but that’s a little different, nor will I charge for it (not that I can fathom anyone paying to read anything I have to say). It’s just not what brought me to here, not what I’m looking for.

There is certainly a difference to charging to offset the cost of a blog and the creators time, like you see on Substack, and setting up an OF account. As you mentioned, I don’t have an issue with others taking this route. Some of the content out there is very professional and must take hours to create. So, I can see the desire. But with all the anti-naturist messaging out there, I think we need as much open, free, accessible positive naturist messaging as we can get. Charging for it simply ensures you are preaching to the already converted.

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You make an interesting point with regards what kind of messaging is needed ATM in time for naturism.

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When any "ism", or "theory", when practiced without any intentional commercial gain, it may maintain it's objectives. However if it gets practiced with commercial approach then the movement does get diluted & may get diverted from its original objectives. Passion & profession should remain separate as far as possible. Someone can have passion & profession as one, however then it's his/her choice as to whether allow profession to ride over passion..

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I think is is harder to separate passion and profession these days. Many people of a particular generation want their passion and profession to be the same. That is a laudable purposeful approach but it can be tricky to navigate especially when you seek to represent a collective group or movement. Is your professional brand the same as brand of the group you represents?

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Jun 30, 2023Liked by BOPBadger

what you say is correct & that's why i also mentioned that the profession & passion can be one. The crucial part is as to whether I have to compromise with the group/movement values in order to keep on my profession.

As far as my option, fortunately, my passion & profession were always different. In 2019, I retired from my profession.

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Once again you tackled a sticky subject with great aplomb. When I broached the subject of the emerging naturist content creator class online I was summarily dismissed. There are two simple issues for me and you raised both. First. Is this the best way to promote naturism? Does it create too close of an association with the porn industry to effectively be a form of promotion. Pay per view nudity as I describe starts to seem a lot like soft core porn in the eyes of those out side of nudist circles,simple despite the protestations to the contrary of the naturist creator class. When I first raised the question there were already "nude models" and others who were offering photos of nude bodies under the naturist or artistic in nature label. This leads to the second issue.

Since those early days the number of individuals who offer pay per view nudity on various platforms has only increased. How many is enough? If we choose to only support a few "special" ones, then have we created a new elite class of "naturists" or more accurately "nudists" (since the focus is photos and videos of naked bodies, some more active than others). Is the discretionary/disposable income of those interested in naturism better spent on vicariously living through nudist content creators or participating in actual naturist experiences. I think the latter. What happens to those who can’t afford to pay per view.

That raises the second concern I have. The nudist content creator took a page from the mainstream social media creator book. The interesting thing about the emergence of social media creators is they didn’t actually create anything. It was just about developing a cult of personality and giving people a glimpse in their lives. The nude content creators save a few exceptions provide views of the naked body. Unlike naturist authors who create naturist literature. Or the naturist writers and commentators on Substack like yourself who create long form essays and informational pieces, or naked yoga or fitness instructors who share a skill and teach others. What's wrong with that you may say? For the answer to that I lean on naturist philosopher, author and filmmaker Marc Alain Descamps and the American naturist leader Lee Baxandall. Both of these individuals espoused an approach to naturism which has a greater impact on society beyond, exposing naked bodies to the unfettered consumerist gaze. Lost in the show me the money approach of the nude content creator is the opportunity to pursue and promote the naturist social project Descamps described. Baxandall dream was this social project would civilize society not just enrich individuals.

At the end of the day people have the right to do whatever they want with their bodies and if making a living is one of those things far be it from me to deny that opportunity. But I mourn the loss of the soul of naturism and it’s greater purpose if that becomes the defining image of naturism. Thanks again for a thought provoking piece.

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Jun 29, 2023Liked by BOPBadger

I don't begrudge Hector and Francelli for monetizing some of their naturist content. That they chose OF is of no concern since not all the accounts are of an "adult" nature. Even if an account has "adult" material doesn't make it unacceptable. Many of us enjoy watching adult content. The problem is when people who identify as naturists/nudists make adult content. It can confuse those who expect otherwise in keeping with the purer philosophy of naturism/nudism. I'm not sure what content will be shown in H&F's new OF account that can't be published on public social media like Twitter. Maybe it is the same content but of a more premium nature. Longer videos. More photos. Exclusive stuff that is not published on social media. They need to be careful about tarnishing the brand that they have built.

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